USA TODAY, part of Gannett Co., Inc., announced that Nicole Carroll will become editor in chief of USA TODAY effective March 2018. Carroll joins USA TODAY after serving as vice president of news and editor of the Arizona Republic (Republic) and azcentral.com since 2015.

“Nicole embodies the values, journalistic excellence, integrity and fierce competitive spirit USA TODAY needs to further its position as a trusted national news leader,” said Maribel Perez Wadsworth, president, USA TODAY NETWORK and associate publisher, USA TODAY. “At the Arizona Republic, Nicole has proven to be a dynamic community leader, committed champion of the First Amendment and a tireless advocate for her readers. She has led award-winning, groundbreaking work that pushed the boundaries of digital storytelling and, importantly, delivered impact and changed lives. We are proud of Nicole and look forward to seeing her energy and passion make its imprint on USA TODAY.”

Carroll joined the Republic in 1999, where she has held jobs ranging from city editor to planning editor to managing editor for features. She was named executive editor of the Republic and azcentral.com in 2008. That same year, Carroll was inducted into the Arizona State University Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication Alumni Hall of Fame. In 2015, she was named vice president of news and editor and in 2016 she added regional responsibilities, serving as southwest regional editor for the USA TODAY NETWORK. Carroll received The National Press Foundation’s prestigious 2017 Benjamin C. Bradlee “Editor of the Year” award and, for the past six years, the Republic/azcentral.com has twice been named a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Breaking News.

Other recent accomplishments led by Carroll include leading the effort to fight two significant violations of journalists’ First Amendment rights. The Republic fought both cases all the way to the Arizona Court of Appeals — and won. The Republic also launched major projects revealing the reasons behind the record number of abused and neglected children in state care; as well as how the rising Arizona heat disproportionally kills low-income residents. Forty state workers got their jobs back after Republic investigative work revealed they had been wrongly fired. And a two-year concerted investigative effort on the state’s school voucher system revealed it helps mostly the wealthy rather than the poor, as lawmakers had promised.

Carroll graduated from the Arizona State University Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication in 1991. She earned her master’s degree from Georgetown University in 1996. After graduation from ASU, she held reporting and editing jobs at the El Paso Times, USA TODAY and the East Valley (Mesa) Tribune.

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