The Washington Post knows that people who visit the homepage of its website are more likely to become subscribers, and that subscribers who visit the homepage are less likely to churn, so it overhauled the homepage in an attempt to lure more readers to it, reports Digiday.

According to Digiday, on March 9, “the Post began testing a new design for its homepage that shows off more kinds of the paper’s content. Instead of lists of articles published in different sections of the site, each section now gets its own bucket of stories selected by editors. The design, which will be visible to 20% of the Post’s national audience at first, is also meant to foreground the Post’s stable of opinion writers, a direct response to reader feedback that the paper’s product team has been gathering.

““The No. 1 biggest thing we’re learning in our user research is that people are just really overwhelmed by the amount of information that’s out there,” said Kat Downs Mulder, the Post’s vp of product. “It’s about making sure the journalism we produce is easy to consume.”

“Above, an example of the new buckets of each section of the Post. Below, an example of the lists featured on the older version of the site.

“Downs Mulder said the Post plans to roll out additional changes to the homepage every few weeks, and the product team will rely on both qualitative and quantitative feedback to assess audience response. Two of the quantitative metrics the Post will watch most closely is number of homepage visits, as well as how much time elapses between visits to the homepage.”

More here.

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