By Connor Hurson

As if everything wasn’t fast enough, we can now speed it up even more. Hyperlapse is a simplified way to record, edit and share time-lapse videos on-the-go, all on your smartphone. The app, owned and developed by Instagram, packs some pretty neat features for casual and power users alike. Simply record, adjust playback speed, save and share..it’s that easy. One hidden feature–arguably the app’s most powerful feature–is its advanced image stabilization which ultimately makes the app useful to the everyday user. To read more about Hyperlapse and see some creative uses of it, head over to Mashable.

Imagine turning a person’s cell signal into useful marketing data. That’s exactly what Facebook is doing by taking a user’s cell signal into account for ad targeting. This innovation really comes into play when considering emerging markets where most users generally aren’t using the newest devices, and bandwidth might be hard to come by. Users in North America and Europe accounted for 72% of Facebook’s Q2 ad revenue, whereas those same users only account for 38% of regular Facebook users. It’s clear that in the development of this new technology Facebook is trying to close that gap considerably. To find out more about Facebook and it’s newest tactic on ad targeting, check out AdAge.

Watching other people play video games? How many people really do that? Well the real answer is…a lot. And that explains why Amazon, the e-retailer turned aspiring content-provider, just purchased Twitch for over a billion dollars ($1.1B). The company’s publicly provided metrics show that during peak viewership hours, Twitch rivals many household cable-networks during primetime, which explains why Amazon see’s such value in the company (eyeballs = dollars). During those peak hours, Twitch see’s an average of 567,000 viewers compared to MTV’s 560k and MSNBC’s 607k. The first reaction many people had of hearing the news was, “What’s Twitch?” However Amazon has no fear that this niche market has barely been cracked. To read more about Amazon and the Twitch acquisition, take a look at the New York Times.

Drop the delivery man. Cut the caterer. Your favorite on-demand driving service is now delivering something else besides rides–Uber is delivering lunch. Well, technically they’re only delivering lunch to users in the Santa Monica area, but the new-age driving service insists that if the test-market performs favorably, they will expand the service elsewhere. Uber users can select the service, called uberFRESH within the app, see what the daily meal is and request it be delivered wherever they are. The lunch delivery service is only one of many new services that Uber is offering to select markets across the U.S. right now. To read more about uberFRESH and the other test services, visit The Washington Post.

Pinsights. Genius, right? While that may seem like a no-brainer name, Pinterest must have their hands full with implementing and monitoring their new analytics tools for businesses that launched earlier this week. The Pinterest Analytics for Business tools will help digital marketing managers around the globe to better track, analyze and interpret data coming from their company’s Pinterest page. With metrics relating to audience demographics to data on what ‘Pins’ drive the most traffic to their site, Pinterest is working feverishly to keep up with the growing demand from marketers to provide quantitative data and analysis. Interested in how Pinterest’s new analytics tools will help you and your organization? Check out the Wall Street Journal.

This post first appeared on the Carousel30 blog.

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