Gregg Glaviano

Capitol Communicator is running a series featuring profiles of communicators in the mid-Atlantic.  In this “Up Close and Personal” profile, we feature Gregg Glaviano, Principal and Creative Director at Grafik in Alexandria, VA. Photography for this series is by Cade Martin; wardrobe styling by Pascale Lemaire for THE Artist Agency; and hair and makeup by Patti D Nelson and Janice Kinigopoulos for THE Artist Agency.

Gregg, please provide us a short bio.

I started my professional career in Baton Rouge, LA, after graduating from LSU. I’m a partner and creative director at Grafik. I just celebrated my 25th year at Grafik. Crazy huh? Good people! I enjoy designing, my relationships with our clients, mentoring young talent and helping lead our ever-evolving organization.

Are you involved in any other organizations?

My husband, myself and some friends in Rehoboth, Delaware, have hosted an event called “Erase Hate” for the past five year, benefiting the Matthew Shepard Foundation. The goal is spread a message of understanding, compassion and acceptance within the community. This year we’ve taken it a step further and have added a second event called “Skate Don’t Hate” to engage a younger audience.

I also sing and have been involved in a Washington, D.C., jazz vocalist group. It’s funny, I always say I’m more comfortable singing than speaking in public.

What are the things you are most proud of?

My relationship. Approaching my role at Grafik as a partner and leader with respect for the folks I work with. My garden.

Who were your personal role models?

I’d have to say it’s a mix of folks. I went to LSU and… well, I wouldn’t claim it was the capitol of great design. I was fortunate to have two excellent teachers named Ruth and Peter Millwerd. They were very “Bauhaus”— not that I had a clue what that meant in the day.

Judy Kirpich, our founding partner at Grafik, has been my boss, my partner, my “Jewish mom,” my friend. Her work ethic, business ethics, creative leadership and values have played a major role in my professional path.

I’d also have to say that some of my music teachers have been what I’ve ended up calling, “angels” that have come into my life and taught me the importance of being true to myself, and the value of living in the moment.

Did your role models offer professional advice that helped you in your career?

I don’t recall a remarkable quote. I’d say in my experiences performing many types of music—theater, gospel, opera, jazz have all emphasized being in that moment. You can’t sing something the same way twice no matter how hard you try. That lesson has carried over into so may aspects of my personal and professional approach. Be yourself. Show yourself. Don’t be afraid. Be in the moment.

What professional advice do you have for others?

Don’t internalize—articulate. Take charge. Be honest. Acknowledge others for their accomplishments.

What advice do you have on appropriate attire for your organization?

I’m a pretty casual guy and I much prefer to be comfortable. That said, what you wear does leave an impression. Find you own style, and don’t confuse sloppy or inappropriate with casual. When you meet with a client, step it up in you own way.

Where do you buy most of the clothes you wear to the office?

It’s a mix. The shirt I’m wearing in the photo is by Scott Spar in Rehoboth. I shop at Rock Creek, South Moon Under, Haute Look and Gilt. I pretty much like anything Vince. And then there’s t-shirts and jeans. My GEICO “hump day” t-shirt makes it out some Wednesdays.

Is there anything else you would like us to know about you?

I’m honored to be a part of this series.

About The Author

The only child of a university art professor and freethinker mother, Cade Martin grew up surrounded by shapes and images. His love of art grew out of summer vacations filled with trips to galleries, museums and art studios. At home he often found himself around the dinner table with an eclectic cast of characters – sculptors, writers and painters. They paraded through his childhood, shaping his art foundation and forming his appreciation for the candid beauty found in people from all walks of life. Cade’s been chasing characters ever since. He seeks out their stories-told through the architecture of their faces or the costumes they wear-whether he’s on a commercial production or setting up an Avedon-like photo booth at Comic Con. They are the heroes in his pictures. His thirst for capturing adventures took its hold while shooting stills on movie sets and then as a photographer for National Geographic covering the railways of India. And it is that sense of adventure that Cade brings to his productions elevating the ordinary to the extraordinary with a cinematic touch. It’s not just a picture. He’s committed to the experience, building beautiful environments and, sometimes for his portraits, simply building trust. A talented storyteller, Cade splits his time between the East and West Coasts creating images for editorial, advertising, fashion, and lifestyle clients

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